New Publication

Translating evidence based programs from controlled settings into real-world community settings is challenging. Inevitably, life gets in the way, and programs are not implemented as they were originally designed or intended. Measuring implementation factors can help guide future implementation and improve program outcomes. A new study, published in the journal, Health Promotion Practice, presents methods to

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A study led by FAS researchers, Jason Goldstick and Justin Heinze, studied how parental support and perceived peer behaviors increase or decrease the risk for marijuana use and if it is different between age and gender. Peer influences are found to be the most important risk factor for substance use, and parental support is frequently

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A new study led by PRC faculty member, Justin Heinze examined the exposure to violence during adolescence and how that may increase the risk of depression and anxiety symptoms in early adulthood. Researchers also took into account the individual’s friendship attachment during adolescence and whether it influences the risk of the depression and anxiety symptoms

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New research from the PRC, just published in the Journal of Women’s Health, examines long-term outcomes of violence victimization in African American women. The research confirmed associations drawn in previous studies between violence victimization, psychological distress, and substance abuse, but went a step further and investigated the indirect effects of these factors on pap smear

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Findings from a recent publication by PRC and YVPC affiliate faculty, Dr. Sarah Stoddard, suggests that positive future orientation (i.e., individual’s thoughts and feelings about their future) may play a key role in the prevention of alcohol and other drug use among adolescents. The article that was recently published in the journal Youth & Society,

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A new study led by our colleague, Jorge Varela at the Universidad del Desarollo in Santiago, Chile, examined the relationship between school violence and life satisfaction among youth, specifically looking at the role that school satisfaction may also play in that relationship. The researchers analyzed data from a sample of 802 seventh graders from three different cities in Chile and

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Interactions between police and the communities they serve have always been an important component to police efficacy, as the police depend on community residents to both report crimes, and cooperate with them in their investigations. However, the tension between the two groups, though not a new phenomenon, has been highlighted recently by numerous, very public

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A  study of middle school students in Warsaw, Poland examined both the risk factors and promotive factors associated with adolescent substance abuse.  The survey questionnaire and items were based on those used for Flint Adolescent Study. Substance abuse is a significant issue for adolescents in Poland. Poland transitioned from a socialist to capitalist economy several decades ago. 

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A new publication from the Flint Adolescent Study explores how family functioning throughout the adolescent years relates to sexual risk behaviors among teens. HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs) remain a major public health concern in the US. Adolescents are at increased risk for HIV/STI and Black adolescents are disproportionately affected. Previous studies have

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ANN ARBOR—Thirty minutes of counseling during an emergency room visit can decrease a young person’s involvement in future violent behaviors, researchers at the University of Michigan have found. Researchers from the Michigan Youth Violence Prevention Center and the U-M Injury Center found that a single, structured counseling session delivered to high-risk youth by a social

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ANN ARBOR—Young African-American women who live in fear of the violence in their neighborhoods are more likely to become obese when they reach their 20s and 30s, new research from the University of Michigan Flint Adolescent Study shows. The community-based study in Flint, Mich., reveals that African-American girls who express fear about their violent surroundings

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Friendship attachment style during adolescence is linked to depressive symptoms for Africans Americans during the transition to young adulthood. A recent publication from the Flint Adolescent Study describes how attachment style may influence depression for low-income, urban African American adolescents at high risk for both insecure attachment and depression. Previous researchers have identified several types of friendship attachment

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