Health Promotion Through Environmental Design (HPTED)

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Project Details

Description

Health Promotion Through Environmental Design (HPTED) is focused on addressing inequalities in health. It is guided by Busy Streets Theory (BST) which empowers communities. by bringing people together so they can make their neighborhoods safer and healthier. HPTED is the core project of the PRC-MI.

Our goal is to support residents with the resources to make positive changes in their neighborhoods. To accomplish this we focus on reducing violence, creating spaces for people to feel safe getting fresh air and exercise, and empowering residents to work together in managing their neighborhoods. Through HPTED we will identify the key ingredients for success.

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In order to achieve this goal, we will integrate two frameworks: Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED) along with Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI) principles.

Our research project is designed to adapt CPTED for health promotion and health equity as a way to empower neighborhoods to create safe and healthy built environments to improve psychological and behavioral health. 

Our research project will take place in Flint, MI where we have worked with the community on our research for over 20 years. Our community partnerships, previous studies, research experience, and work with multiple universities will help create an approach to healthy and inclusive change.

What is CPTED?

Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED) is a way to create busy streets. CPTED is an evidence-based approach that creates secure neighborhoods by making both physical and social environmental changes.

Physical changes include enhanced surveillance, improved visibility, and improved signage. It also includes other strategies to show people care about and use public spaces. Social CPTED strategies involve neighborhood residents planning, bonding, and celebration. Opportunities for resident involvement is key to the success of CPTED.

These strategies focus on improving safety and reducing crime and violence. We would like to take a closer look at their direct effects on health. We also aim to include elements of community organizing, empowerment, critical thinking, and problem-solving with an eye towards health equity.

Incorporating DEI for health improvement

HPTED will focus on the needs of the community through Diversity Equity and Inclusion (DEI) principles. The project is designed to adapt CPTED for health promotion and health equity through empowered neighborhoods. Our goal is to work with residents to create safe and healthy environments to improve psychological and behavioral health.

Our team will draw on our many years of partnerships and research experience within the Flint, MI community. Combining DEI training with CPTED will increase critical thinking about fundamental and environmental causes of inequities. We will work with residents to consider neighborhood changes that address community and individual health issues and engage in the process of achieving health equity. CPTED will include health-focused DEI principles to create a transformative approach to addressing health disparities that center residents in neighborhood change.

Specific Aims

Our specific aims to achieve our goal are:

  1. Adapt HPTED to integrate CPTED and DEI, guided by implementation science frameworks, to develop an intervention that is informed by practice-based evidence and is implementable for communities;
  2. Test the effectiveness of HPTED in a block group randomized design on violence reduction, healthy built environment, and community empowerment, and direct effects on psychological and behavioral health;
  3. Investigate if violence reduction, healthy built environment, and community empowerment are a mechanism by which HPTED improves psychological and behavioral health (i.e., indirect effects).
  4. Develop an actionable and feasible evidenced-based toolkit for communities interested in adopting HPTED using our implementation and effectiveness data to guide its development.